The House Fire

This is my account of a crap-tacular evening, which occurred a little over a week ago, when my husband and I came home from work and saw our neighbor’s home had been burned in broad daylight.

We didn’t notice anything strange about the neighbor’s house until we had already parked in our own driveway. We noticed the small things first, like the white vans, instead of the gutted home. When we finally did notice, my husband and I stood in the driveway for a spell, trying to piece together meaning from the clues. Old man Jones, who lives across the street, and his granddaughter, Anna, who lives around the corner, walked over our driveway to relieve us of wondering. Continue reading

Media I’m Consuming

I recently discovered the Night Vale Radio podcast. I wasn’t sure what to expect at first, but I was pleasantly surprised by the wit and imagination of the show. Each episode you get a glimpse of this superbly weird, oppressed, and sinister town, along with the goofy commentary of the radio host. I’m relatively new to podcasts, and I liked this one a lot. One of my favorite parts of the podcast is when the radio broadcast has the “weather” forecast, when they play an indie song. Each song is so refreshing and different from most music on popular radio.

I finished Mockingjay  recently. I think the ending is worth a post in itself. For now, I’ll just say that it was an excellent young adult trilogy, but for me it lost its power in the end. Maybe you’ll get the pleasure of hearing more of that, later ;).

I’ve been trying to get into the Codex Alera series for a few months now. Recommended to me by my husband, the book tends to excite me for about 5 minutes and then lose my interest. I’m not sure exactly why. Any interest I have in the story is fleeting, even though it is a high-paced fantasy book. Why am I still trying to read it? Glutton for punishment, I suppose.

Maybe it’s hard for me to get into the descriptions of flying, jumping into other peoples’ bodies, and choking them with air. All of these descriptions seem so abstract and intangible to me. So much of the narrative seems internal, making it difficult to imagine scenes in my head.

On the other hand, I like to hold out hope that the book will engage me again. I don’t want to give up on it before I’ve truly given it a chance. I think I need to read the whole first book until I decide to continue with the series or not.

I’m also reading Tribal Leadership. This book is great, whether you are in the corporate world or not. It’s great for understanding dynamics within different groups of people. For a nonfiction book, it is surprisingly engaging. The authors based their findings on research, but they also bring in personal stories of real people and organizations.

On another note (more curses than chamomile), I have a splotchy rash on my left hand blossoming and multiplying like a colony of shaved, sunburned bunnies (Is that a sufficient image? I’m not sure. I’ve stayed up a bit later than usual). Anyway, I struggle with some ocd tendencies (who doesn’t, right?) and I go a bit crazy on the hand washing in winter time. My skin is paying for it. Usually my hands are bleeding by this time of the winter, so just a rash is great in my book. I need to chill out about the germs, though.

Do you ever think about that? When you check out books from the library? Every page has been touched by fingers you don’t know. The books have been taken places you’ll never see. You’ll never know if the person before you was reading in bed with the flu. Maybe a drip of snot slowly dripped down and they wiped it with their hand before closing the book and falling asleep with their feverish brow on the book sleeve. And you are touching that book…

Happy Reading!!!! (****Evil Cackling****)

P.S. Author not responsible for any compulsive hand-washing that last paragraph inspired.

Healthcare Heros and HealthCouldn’tCareLess Humbugs

I work with a woman in her twenties who is battling breast cancer.  I’m only a recent acquaintance, yet she always has a smile for me. And a real one, too. I never really knew anyone who battled a major cancer so young before, until I met her. She was a girl with long brown hair when I met her, and now she’s bald.

How does a person continue with life even when the unimaginable happens? Who helps them answer their questions and learn how to live with this news? So many times, there is much less emotional support available than people need.

Continue reading